You have heard me discuss the idea of “eating in accordance with the seasons” in previous blog entries. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), in order to maintain a physiological balance of yin and yang, it is necessary to consider the foods we eat as they relate to the season we are in.  For example, during the cold winter months it is wise to eat more warming foods and spices like cinnamon and ginger, and in the hot months of summer we should eat more cooling foods like melons and mint.

Mother nature further guides us by providing different foods each season.  When we preserve a healthy yin/yang balance, we are promoting healthy sleep, appetite, emotional balance, immune function, and energy.

Grocery shopping in modern America is confusing for seasonal eating.  We can seemingly buy all foods all year round.  But have you tasted a strawberry recently? They are less sweet, less juicy red, and less satisfying than those we could buy a few months ago, in the heart of the summer months.  Read the rest of this entry »

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Why Asian Pears?

November 16, 2010

As we continue into autumn, many of my patients have been reporting what are known in Chinese Medicine as lung dryness symptoms.

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine theory, each season has a corresponding organ system.   The organ system corresponding to autumn is the lung, and the lung system is particularly vulnerable and sensitive to dryness.  Therefore it is very common to express lung dryness symptoms such as a dry cough, dry skin, dry throat, and dry nasal passages during autumn’s dry days.

In additional to applying topical moisturizing agents and taking medicinals to suppress cough, we can choose to eat foods that moisten and protect our lung system internally.  Eating foods that are in season are mother nature’s medicines that help to both prevent and ease symptoms.

One food to moisten lung dryness is an Asian Pear.  Read the rest of this entry »